Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Japanese Porcelain

Somewhere in the early 17th century, Japanese potters started to make porcelain. It was inspired by underglaze blue porcelain manufactured in kilns of Southern China. By the mid-17th century, Chinese porcelain went into decline due to social unrest and accompanying dynastic change. Dutch merchants, from their base on the small island of Deshima, near Nagasaki, were permitted to trade with Japan. Responding to European demand, the Dutch encouraged the fledgling Japanese porcelain industry to fill the gap left by China.

 

The porcelain the Dutch brought to Europe in the 17th century was in most cases consciously designed to cater to western tastes. To ensure that they would find a ready market, the Dutch often made wooden or earthenware models of designs and sent those to Japan to be copied. 

 

Flasks, ewers and large dishes are examples for shapes made for the Dutch. They are painted in underglaze blue or a palette of enamels dominated by red, green and blue with flowers, figures and landscapes which would not follow traditional Japanese aesthetics. Vessels with landscape designs are often inspired by 17th century Chinese Transitional style. Plates decorated with designs organized by panels imitate the successful blue-and-white Chinese Kraak ware. To make these export wares even more attractive for the Dutch clients numbers of early Japanese export wares are painted with a stylized tulip, referring to the tulipomania, the great Dutch craze of the 1630s. (Source: Keramiek Museum Princessehof, Leeuwarden)

The objects for sale are listed in the categories below, please click on a page to view the objects.

Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century

 

Dishes

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Other wares

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Japanese Blue and White wares 18th Century

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Japanese Imari

1690-1800

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‘Gold’ Imari

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Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only

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Kakiemon /

Kakiemon style wares

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Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

18th Century

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Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs

1653-1800

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Japanese wares over-decorated  in the West

18th Century

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