Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Recent Acquisitions

On this page you'll find my latest acquisitions, It may, however, take some time for all objects to load.

 

This way you can quickly browse through my recently acquired objects without having to browse through all the various categories.

 

After four weeks each object in 'Recent Acquisitions' will be moved to their specific category.

 

Latest update; January 17, 2020.

2012247
2012247

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800

 

Object 2012247

 

Ewer

 

Japan

 

1670-1690

 

Height 184 mm (7.24 inch), diameter handle to spout 115 mm (4.53 inch), diameter of mouthrim 27 mm (1.06 inch), diameter of footring 57 mm (2.24 inch), weight 395 grams (13.93 ounce (oz.))

 

Pear shaped ewer on footring. Slender upright spout with a curved C-shaped handle.Fitted with an contemporary unmarked Dutch silver mount. Decorated in underglaze blue with a roundel inscribed with the initial 'A' for the Dutch word azijn (vinegar) surrounded by various plants growing from rockwork on both sides of the body, on the neck an upturned lotus leaves-pattern border and on the handle and spout classic foliate patterns. 

 

A specific group of ewers is decorated with the letters 'O´, 'A', or 'S' indicating their contents: 'O' stands for olie (oil), 'A' for azijn (vinegar), 'L' for limoen (lemon), the 'S' or 'Z' for soya or zoja (soy). They were used at the dinner table in The Netherlands. Arts adds the letter 'C' for conserven (?) (preserves). Oil and vinegar sets with inscribed initials were made in Delft faience, often with a container for two or four ewers, such Delftware examples were used as models for the Japanese imitations. Chinese ewers of this period with initials are not known, but close copies of the Japanese pieces were made in the 18th century. 'oil and vinegar jugs' were mentioned as early as 1664, but these were probably ordinary small ewers without initials. (Arts 1983, p.50), (Jörg 2003/1, pp.176-177)

  

For identically shaped and sized ewers, please see:

For a sold ewer initialed with the letter 'O' for olie (oil), please see:

Condition: Firing flaws, caused by the firing process, to the handle and the underside of the spout. A partial rough unglazed upper rim of the spout and a shallow chip to the underside of the tip of the spout.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 108

Daendels 1981, cat. 104

Arts 1983, p.50

Jörg 2003/1, pp.176-177

 

Price: € 999 - $ 1,110 - £ 851

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011133
2011133

Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Dishes

 

Object 2011133

 

Dish

 

China

 

1610-1630

 

Height 55 mm (2.17 inch), diameter 317 mm (12.48 inch), diameter of footring 165 mm (6.50 inch), weight, including the brass fame, 1,046 grams (36.89 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, slightly scalloped flat rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with the ducks-in-a-pond motif, encircled by an eight-pointed scalloped medallion. On the sides and rim large panels filled with fruit and flower motifs and auspicious symbols alternating with narrow panels filled with dots and a diaper or scale pattern. On the reverse large ogival or round panels filled with fungus and dots and narrow panels with lingzhi motifs. Fitted in a custom-made brass frame engraved 'H.W. Kardolus Delft'. 

 

According to Rinaldi this dish can be classified as a Border VII.2 dish. Here the large panels on the border are no longer filled with floral sprays or insects, while the peach has begun its transformation into what is known as the sunflower motif. Auspicious symbols replace floral sprays and insects, most of them concerned with longevity, as if to ward off the dangers of wars and famines which swept over China at that time. These symbols are usually Daoist or the Eight treasures. Buddhist symbols are much rarer. In this group narrow panels are partly filled with diaper motifs. In the centre Medallion the ducks in a pond and the hanging basket are still very common. In this group a new motif appears: a bird on a rock near water and large flowers, usually peonies. The scheme of the underside repeats that of the front. Large ogival or round panels contain fungus and dots; narrow sections contain stylised lingzhi motifs. In this group narrow panels are partly filled with diaper motifs while there are a few dishes which do not have a diaper border around the central medallion. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.100-105)

 

A design of a wild duck at a lotus pond signifies blessings for a fruitful marriage, since a marriage proposal was made by a man sending a duck to the woman's family as a present. Acceptance of the duck meant acceptance of the proposal. The lotus, shown in different stages of growth, symbolizes purity and abundant offspring by recalling the common phrase "from the lotus comes noble offspring". (Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, p.288, Serial No. 5095

 

For similarly decorated dishes with the ducks-in-a-pond motif, please see:

The dish is fitted in a custom-made brass fame that is engraved: 'H.W. Kardolus Delft'. H.W. Kardolus had an art dealing, framing and engraving business in the city of Delft where he worked from 1920 to 1950. This indicates that the brass frame was probably fitted to the dish somewhere in first half of the 20th century.

 

 2011133 10a H.W. Kardolus Delft (1) 

 

 

 

W.H. Kardolus Delft Uit Almanak van de Delftsche vrouwelijke studenten vereeninging voor het jaar 1948

Advertisment from H.W. Kardolus in 'Almanak van de Delftsche vrouwelijke studenten Vereeniging voor het jaar 1948'.

   

Condition: Three firing flaws, caused by the firing process, to the reverse, some shallow glaze rough spots to the rim and a shallow chip to the inner footring.

 

References:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.100-105 &  Pl.90 & Pl.93

Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, p.288 & Serial No. 2454 & 5095

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012239
2012239

Japanese Blue and White wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012239

 

Bottle

 

Japan

 

c.1780

 

Height 330 mm (12.99 inch), diameter 135 mm (5.31 inch), diameter of mouthrim 16 mm (0.63 inch), diameter of footring 70 mm (2.76 inch), weight 878 grams (30.97 ounce (oz.))

 

Pear-shaped bottle on footring, rounded body, tall narrow neck. Decorated in underglaze blue with around the foot a band of lappets. On the body a group of three flowering plants, bamboo, prunus and pine, alternating with three groups of irises. Round the neck a border of descending leafs.

 

The band of lappets round the foot can also be seen on polychrome bottles dating the same period in the late 18th century.

 

For a similarly shaped and dated bottles, please see;

Condition: Firing flaws to the base and foot, a frit to the rim and a chip to the inner footring.

 

References:

Kyushu 1995, cat. 266 & 237

Kyushu 2003, cat. 3780 & 3781

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010C313
2010C313

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes

 

Object 2010C313

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1740

 

Height 49 mm (1.93 inch), diameter of rim 272 mm (10.71 inch), diameter of footring 140 mm (5.51 inch), weight 708 grams (24.97 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with a phoenix or pheasant perched on rockwork looking up to another phoenix or pheasant in flight. Various flowering plants originate from the rockwork, On the sides three pine trees each enclosing a large golden roundel. The pine trees are flanked by blossoming prunus and cherry trees. On the reverse three widespread flowering cherry blossom sprays. On the base a rectangular paper label with the handwritten letter 'M' in blue ink.  

 

For a smaller but identically shaped and decorated dish, please see:

Condition: Two firing flaws to the rim, caused by the firing process.

 

References:

Kyushu 1991, cat. 560

Kyushu 2003, cat. 2848

 

Price: € 899 - $ 1,004 - £ 768

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012172
2012172

Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century

 

Object 2012172

 

Bowl

 

Japan

 

c.1670

 

Height 106 mm (4.17 inch), diameter of rim 215 mm (8.46 inch), diameter of footring 85 mm (3.35 inch), weight 810 grams (28.57 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, straight sides. Decorated in underglaze blue with three stylised medallions filled with a flower head surrounded by flower sprays alternating with dots. In between the medallions flower heads with leafy sprays, round the base a pointed pendant leaves-pattern border. Round the inner rim a geometric-pattern border. On the bottom two large flower heads with leafy branches in a double concentric band. Marked on the base with the Chokichidani (Arita) ovens mark within a single-lined circle, underglaze blue.

 

Sherds of similar bowls have been found at the Nishinobori kiln (not Chokichidani).

 

Such bowls would probably have been made for the South-East Asian market, another similarly shaped, sized and decorated bowl is in an English private collection.

 

For a similarly decorated Japanese bowl with the Chokichidani (Arita) ovens mark, please see:

For a sold dish, marked with the Chokichidani (Arita) ovens mark, please see:

Condition: A popped bubble of glaze, caused by the firing process, to the inner rim and some rough spots to the footring.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011541
2011541

Japanese wares over-decorated in the West 18th Century - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont

 

Object 2011541

 

Teapot

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height with cover 97 mm (3.81 inch), height without cover 67 mm (2.64 inch), diameter handle to spout 124 mm (4.88 inch), diameter of mouthrim 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter of foot 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight with cover 237 grams (8.36 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 46 grams (1.62 ounce (oz.))

  

Globular pear-shaped teapot on footring, fluted body. Curved handle and a straight spout. Ribbed cover and knob. Decorated in underglaze blue and gold, over-decorated in iron-red and green and black enamel in The Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1750-1770. On each side two in underglaze blue with overglaze gold outlined reserves filled with a flower basket with ribbons and various flowering plants. round the neck a silkworm-pattern border in green and black enamel. On the handle a floret between scrolls and on the spout stylised spays. On the cover a flower basket with ribbons and various flowering plants alternating with a flower spray.

 

Amsterdams Bont is the name given to a specific group of Japanese or Chinese porcelain that was over-decorated with enamels in the Netherlands. The group consists of bowls, plates, vases, cups and saucers, etc., that were painted in underglaze blue in Jingdezhen or Arita (Japan) and shipped to Holland. Because colored wares yielded more profits than the ordinary blue-and-white, an additional enamelled decoration was painted on these porcelains. Sometimes this new decoration respects the original Chinese or Japanese decoration and elaborates on it. Other times, however, the Dutch painter was not so respectful and over-painted the blue, creating a chaotic design. Of course, it was easier to paint undecorated pieces that were completely white, for which Japanese wares seem to have been preferred. Over-decorating first appears c.1700 and continued far into the 18th century. It was probably done privately by individuals to generate some extra income. These over-painted pieces were fired in local ceramic factories, which did this in addition to their normal assortment. It is likely that this practice was concentrated in Delft, Makkum and Harlingen where earthenware (faience) was produced, but it could also be done in tile factories such as those in Rotterdam. Notwithstanding the name of this category, there is no indication that it was done on a large scale in Amsterdam. Dated pieces are rare, and because there is almost no documentary information on Amsterdams Bont, it is difficult to say when exactly these pieces were made. Usually, carefully painted objects are regarded as early.

 

The demand for Japanese porcelain was strong but production was restricted so here was a gap in the market that the enameller could fill most profitably by giving Chinese porcelain a Japanese look. The simplest way of transferring Chinese porcelain into 'Japanese' was to enhance Chinese blue and white porcelain with iron-red and gold to create the appearance of Imari. For European decorated oriental porcelain mostly Chinese export porcelain objects were used. Only a small proportion were Japanese.

(Espir 2005, p.74)

 

The cover on this teapot seems to be a little large though it fits perfectly, and the decoration is matching. Other identically shaped teapots are known also with a similarly large cover, please see the picture below. (This teapot and cover are not included in this sale/offer)

 

ws

 

Condition: A firing flaw to the handle, overall some fine crazing to the glaze of the teapot, A chip to the underside of the rim of the cover and three chips to the inner rim of the cover.

 

Reference: 

Espir 2005, p.74

 

Price: € 699 - $ 777 - £ 592

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012249
2012249

Shipwreck Porcelains - The Vung Tau Cargo, c.1690

 

Object 2012249

 

Bowl

 

China

 

c.1690

 

Provenance: The Vung Tau Cargo. Chinese Export Porcelain sale, Christie's Amsterdam, 7-8 April 1992.

 

Height 58 mm (2.28 inch), diameter of rim 118 mm (4.65 inch), diameter of footring 42 mm (1.65 inch), weight 193 grams (6.81 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring with spreading sides, a flaring rim and an unglazed base. Covered with a greenish celadon type glaze, decorated in underglaze blue. On the bottom a character in a roundel. On the exterior wall four different characters. On the bowl the original Christie's "Vung Tau Cargo" sale label proving it has been part of lot 963, one of 200 bowls sold in this lot. (Amsterdam 1992, p.128)

 

The Vung Tau Cargo

 

c.1690

 

The Vung Tau Wreck was discovered by fishermen of the islands of Con Dao in the south of Vietnam.

Sverker Hallstrom obtained the license to excavate the wreck after the Vietnam Salvage Corporation

(Visal) had carried out preliminary excavation. The starboard side of the hull, from the keel to the

waterline, remained in good condition. It was found to be the hull of a lorcha, a ship of combined

Eastern and Western influence, and the first ever found. The wreck has been dated to c.1690.

From an analysis of the cargo it seems that the ship was bound from China to Batavia where the

bulk of the ceramics would have been transhipped to a Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde

Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) vessel for the onward voyage to Holland.

 

The porcelain was destined for a port where it would have been transhipped onto a VOC vessel for the

onward voyage to Holland. The other goods were to supply the Chinese community at the same port.

 

That port was Batavia.

 

Christie's Amsterdam auctioned the porcelain cargo in April 1992.

 

These 'provincial' wares formed the bulk of the shipment of southern wares and were originally sold as food bowls, they received minimum care when stowed: piled on top of each other and crammed under roofbeams. (Jörg & Flecker 2001, p.81)

 

In total 2,281 bowls, by Christie's named the 'Provincial blue and white bowls', were sold divided over the lots: 1000-1011. (Amsterdam 1992)

 

Condition: Some firing flaws and a chip to the outer rim. 

 

References: 

Jongsma 1992, pp.453-456

Amsterdam 1992, lots 960-977

Jörg & Flecker 2001, fig. 81

 

Price: € 99 - $ 109 - £ 85

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010984
2010984

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722 - Miniature Doll's House Vases

 

Object 2010984

 

A miniature "doll's house" vase

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter 28 mm (0.87 inch), diameter of mouthrim 15 mm (0.59 inch), diameter of footring 12 mm (0.47 inch), weight 16 grams (0.56 ounce (oz.))

 

Miniature "doll's house" vase on a footring. Decorated in underglaze blue with flowering plants and insects in flight.

 

It was a popular pastime for the ladies of the Dutch patrician society to furnish doll's houses, whose various rooms reflected those of their own town palaces. Apart from the usual furniture, miniature versions of exotic luxury goods such as porcelain, fabrics, carpets and lacquer were obligatory. The doll's house of Petronella Oortman, now in the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, and that of Lita de Ranitz in the Historical Museum of the Hague are considered to be the most prominent examples. The Chinese had produced miniature ceramics for almost one thousand years for the decoration of birdcages, therefore it was no problem for them to supply the Dutch with doll's house porcelain. Miniature pieces were also displayed in ordinary porcelain rooms in cupboards and on brackets along the wall. (Suebsman 2019, p.76)

 

Condition: Some very tiny popped blubbles of glaze, caused by the firing process, to the rim.

 

Reference:

Suebsman 2019, p.76 

 

Price: € 199 - $ 220 - £ 168

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012246
2012246

Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century

 

Object 2012246

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1660-1680

 

Height: 31 mm (1.22 inch), diameter of rim 210 mm (8.27 inch), diameter of footring 111 mm (4.37 inch), weight 318 grams (11.22 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base four spur-marks. Decorated in underglaze blue with a flowerpot with ribbons and tassels on a fenced terrace filled with flowering chrysanthemum and peony plants under a curtain with ribbons and tassels in a circular cartouche. The sides and rim in Chinese Kraak-style with eight large panels containing peach and auspicious symbols and eight narrow panels filled with a scale pattern and dots. The reverse is undecorated.  

 

Tassels and ribbons are an unusual and rare motif on Arita blue-and-white export ware. In the early 18th century tassels and ribbons can be found on Japon de commande Armorial ware for the Van Buren, Van Buren and Van Brederode and the Van Bambeeck family.

 

For a similarly decorated dish, without the tassels and ribbons, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 10

London 1997, cat. 14

Jörg 2003/1, pp.232-233 & cat. 6 

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010736
2010736

Famille Rose wares 1725-1800

 

Object 2010736

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1730-1740

 

Provenance: Mark Powley, Fine Chinese Art, San Francisco, The United States of America.

 

Height of teacup 37 mm (1.46 inch), diameter of rim 72 mm (2.83 inch), diameter of footring 31 mm (1.22 inch), weight 30 grams (1.06 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 20 mm (0.79 inch), diameter of rim 114 mm (4.49 inch), diameter of footring 67 mm (2.64 inch), weight 56 grams (1.98 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, slightly everted rims. Decorated in various famille rose enamels with a peacock near a tiled terrace in a garden landscape with rockwork, a lingzhi, a flowering peony tree and flowering plants. On the rim a diaper-pattern border with four reserves filled with leafy scrolls. The reverse is undecorated. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

The peacock is a symbol of dignity and beauty. It wards off evil and dances when it sees a beautiful woman. As peacocks' feathers were used during the Qing dynasty to denote official ranks, the peacock motif might also express a wish for a good position. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.157)

 

For a dish similarly decorated in various famille rose enamels with peacocks in a garden landscape, please see;

Condition:

Teacup: A tiny frit to the rim.

Saucer: Perfect.

 

References:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.157

Jörg 1999, cat. 78

 

Price: € 749 - $ 824 - £ 640

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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